HARTH technology and Hydro Lance Fast Ships, Fast Ferries, Fast Freighters, Yachts, Coast Guard Rescue, Naval Combatants, Stable Ocean Platform
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HYDRO LANCE CORPORATION

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NEW 'H.A.R.T.H'. TECHNOLOGY

High Aspect Ratio Twin Hull
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Wave Averaging:
Shown is a 'freeze- frame'  from CAD modeling of three Hydro Lance hulls and legs, each representing a different profile of wave averaged displacement between and through wave peak and trough.  As hull speed increases, wave processing increases (wave frequency) to a level of calm water displacement, reaching ultra-high stability and smoothest, while at the same time reaching the lowest levels of hull stress.
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All Hydro-Lance vessels are simple displacement hulls,  with the same math calculations used for weight displacement of a rowboat, or a full sized cargo ship.   However, because conventional ships require significant freeboard (that distance from the water's surface to the top of the hull) to prevent crashing waves from rolling over the deck,  the tonnage of ship displacement often far exceeds the intended use. For example,  the cruise ship Stattendam is a  55,451 metric ton vessel and will carry 1,266 passengers plus a crew of 704; that's 28 tons of ship for every person!  The Hydro-Lance does not utilize but a very few feet of freeboard and therefore a 2,000 metric ton ship may more efficiently accommodate the same mission; one 2,000 gross metric ton Hydro-Lance vessel will carry a net cargo of, at least, 1,000 metric tons, having a significantly higher volume of usable space due to entirely different construction geometry.
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Hull Design: Conventional ocean ships of modern technology utilize an aspect ratio of between 1:3 and 1:10.  The Hydro-Lance technology utilizes an aspect ratio of between 1:60 and 1:100, very different.  Normally there are two hulls designed to a Hydro-Lance ship, but in certain dedicated cargo designs, the ship may be a  tri-hull, mono or multi-hull.  Each hull has a 110% reserve buoyancy, and could float the entire ship if turned up, with all of the weight, displaced on one hull.  These very long and narrow hulls, slender to a knife point bow design, and allowing for the sum calculation of both hulls, the bow wave (drag) is reduced by approximately 85%!  Unlike conventional ships with a draft (that distance from the water's surface to the bottom of the hull), which usually ranges from 20 to 70 feet for a conventional ship, the Hydro-Lance hull draws only from two (smaller ships) to fifteen feet of water in large (20,000 tons) ship designs.  With smaller vessel designs (yachts, fishing and patrol boats), the draft is measured in only inches.  The freeboard is equal to draft.  This needle-nosed displacement hull simply floats; it never hydro-planes,  flies, rises or dives. The Hydro-lance ship is not a catamaran; the hulls of large Hydro-Lance ships, may be between 800 and 1,800 feet long!  These hulls are of aircraft type construction, though compartmentalized, and foam back-filled to 100% bouancy.  Smaller ocean-going HARTH vessels will have hull lengths of 100 feet to 700 feet in length.  Wave drag is reduced by approximately 85%  due to the small cross section, and wetted friction reduction.  View this hull cross section of a light passenger/freighter.
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Wetted Drag: Surface wetted drag (friction), has troubled marine designers throughout history, as the second barrier to increased hull speed design.  The hull sliding through the water directly interfaces the water with predictable resistance.  The Hydro-Lance  HARTH technology has overcome this, with a proprietary system, that provides for a boundary layer, between the hull and the water, for higher speeds. 
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Sea-State:   Every Hydro-Lance ship is designed specifically to a customer/partner designated sea duty; coastal waters, North Atlantic, island duty, trans ocean travel, freight, passengers, etc.  The ship is designed for the worst sea-state to be encountered.  For example,  the design of a trans ocean transport, might be rated for cruising from a a sea-state 6-10, with survivability in a  sea-state 13.  To accomplish this, the hulls are designed to be over one and one half times in length, of the distance, between the wave troughs, within the vessel's maximum rated sea-state.  A similar, but slightly different  formula is utilized for the distance between hulls.  Additionally, the  height of that 'worst wave' becomes,  the distance from the calm water line, of the ocean, to the bottom -side, of the house superstructure, above, that spans the hulls and supports cargo and passenger areas (the house).  
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Stability:  Less than + five degrees roll, at the maximum  sea-state rated for cruising; no heave, no pitch.  These vessels are virtual stable-table platforms at sea.  This is accomplished because of the  hull's long  length and wide footprint.  The length allows the hull to pierce several waves, at the same time,  providing an averaged buoyancy, of the rising and falling waves, with the fall of buoyancy in the canyons of those waves to equal the rise bouancy/speed of those waves;  rise and fall equals zero.   Similarly, in a beam sea,  the rise time of one wave, or swell, passing over the hull is relatively short, and the rise time of one hull calculates to the maximum roll of five degrees.  Now that's  in the worse condition, with the engines off. With higher speed, and any slight change of heading, the  maximum roll is reduced to two degrees, or less. Yes, amazing!  View the difference as compared to a Catamaran in a Sea State 5.
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Speed:    Normally, Hydro-Lance ships are designed for a cruising speed of between 50 and 60 knots.  Accepting some  loss of fuel efficiency, these designs will all accomodate speeds approximately 30% greater, than the rated cruising speed.   Other design modifications ,may allow hull speeds, to above 150 knots, though a price is  paid for fuel efficiency, and radical aerodynamic shapes are required.  Given the difference of density between air and sea water (nearly 800 times greater), going 150 knots through water is the approximate equivalent of, an airplane going Mach eight (8) through the atmosphere.
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Power Plant: The preferred method for larger ships is a diesel fueled gas turbine, directly or electrically coupled with a  large jet drive, or cavitating screw, located in each hull.  However, there are other viable options to study, of any given prime power application; gas turbine turboprop drives mounted under the house, or top side,  diesel engines with hydraulic drives, Opus, direct-drive rotary combustion engines with a cavitating screw..or jet pumps in the hulls, and/or gas turbines with direct thrust from the house, just to mention a few.
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Fuel Use:    Utilizing gas turbines, either JP-4, heating oil #2, or certain other diesel fuels, can be used.  Having an 85% reduction of bow wave formation,  and over a 70% reduction of wetted surface drag, fuel consumption per nautical mile traveled, is reduced by over 50%, as compared with any prime power driven driven displacement mono-hull ship, SWATH,  or catamaran, each having deep drafts, broad beams and unlimited free-board.   That difference is greater for systems such as hydrofoils and hoover craft, which use significant energy for lift; the Hydro-Lance ship requires no lifting energy, and has a  shallow draft, limited free-board, with arrow-like hulls (View).
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Space:    Unlike conventional ships, where usable passenger and cargo space must accommodate bulkheads, ribs, and  the hull's shape itself, the passenger, crew and much of the cargo area of a Hydro-Lance ship, is located  far above the ship's hulls, and far above the ocean surface.  The broad footprint of the hulls, provides the opportunity of unusually good space utilization and efficiency.  Above the superstructure, cargo and (or) passenger areas (the house), can even be constructed free-span, and rectilinear (this area hereafter is called the"house").  For example, a 4,000 metric ton vessel can carry approximately 4,000 metric tons of cargo and passengers (the ship then, will displace a total of 8,000 metric tons gross weight), which then, is the total displacement design, of such a displacement hull ship.  If this  were to be a passenger liner, and allowing 1,000 pounds of weight, for every passenger and their bags (two persons per ton), that ship could, by displacement weight, carry roughly 8,000 persons, including the crew.  The very largest such ships  today, carry approximately 1,500 passengers and maybe a crew of 750.   Where would you put 8,000  people, even if they could be booked?   There is no known way, in conventional ship designs, to accommodate those kind of numbers. This becomes  cost/use weight inefficiency.  Because the Hydro-Lance ship has the house separate from, and far above,  the narrow hulls, each can be separately designed for the specific mission of the ship.   The displacement tonnage can be reduced while the cabin space can be increased, for a better cost efficiency.   Constructing up to eight decks above  (the house) the vessel's superstructure can be accomplished; and these decks are big;  perhaps 100-250 feet wide and 300 feet long, or larger.  HARTH technology, changes the rules of ocean transport, and the design of ships, as we know them!
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Loading Cargo:   The lower deck of the house may be utilized for cargo in ways not seen by the industry.  Cargo, whether that means containers, automobiles or bails of cotton, can be directly lowered on sections of the ship's  deck to an awaiting dock  or sand bar (the ship can straddle a dock or sand bar), and do so in very very shallow waters.  Likewise, an awaiting cargo 'loaded' deck section can be directly lifted to the cargo deck, ready to sail....no more cargo holes, nets and hoists. Larger Hydro-Lance ship designs, can also accommodate cargo containers, in the hulls, which are loaded from the bow, on a rail system; very fast and efficient.  Large cargo vessels, can be designed allow railroad cars to roll directly into the  hulls, and unload in the same manner.   Any Hydro-Lance ship is designed specific to the partner or customer's market, and mission. Cargo Turnaround can now be measured in hours, not days.
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Steering: The hulls of a Hydro-Lance vessel are support the house much the same as snow skies or ice skates; how strong are your ankles compared to your body weight?  The hull behaves much like an arrow.  How fast do you go to get stability?  Water itself demands that the moving hulls (or 'rails' as often stated as meaning hulls) find the path of least resistance, as does an arrow shot from an archer's bow. More energy is required to turn the moving arrow than to keep it straight. Remember, at 60 M.P.H., the rail is traveling at 88 feet per second; you may do a  vector analyses of waves at this speed to see how well this works.  The speed shortens the wave frequency, gaining greater stability and less stress.  The results are amazing. Turning the Hydro-Lance vessel is accomplished from the bow, as different from more conventional ships with stern rudders. The slight angle change of the nose section allows the hull to track in a turning radius of two arc degrees per second at the rated cruising speed, and even faster for emergency situations.  At harbor speeds,  trusters are provided in the rails for tractor turns and docking.
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Copyrighted @1999-2000, Hydro Lance Corporation.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.   Patents, Copyright, Intellectual Property and the H.A.R.T.H. Technology is the sole property of the Hydro Lance Corporation and the Inventor; Robert P. Price. Reproductions to any part of this web site, or any use of the H.A.R.T.H. technology is forbidden, unless  under specific license agreement with the Hydro Lance Corporation or specific written and signed permission is given by the Hydro Lance Corporation..